Our companion of 21 years

This week we had our cat, Junior, put down.

It was very heart breaking to make the decision; it was time for him to crossover. Although we have been expecting this for some time when the time arrived, we were not ready. It was so sudden that our goodbyes had to be short. It has been an emotional roller coaster and our family has run the gamut of emotions. From heart break to guilt to anger and depression and then back through the list again.

Junior was the kitten of our cat Mom. She gave birth to him 21 years ago. All our family life we have had cats in our home. These past 26 years we lived with five cats. All of them lived to be over 21. Each one we helped to crossover to the other side. One died 25 years ago and the other four died within the last two years. About every six months, we went through the emotional gamut again. Junior is the final cat to leave us and our home feels empty.

We decided not to take in any more companions. We are shattered. Our hearts are broken. Looking back, we cannot say that we regretted a single day having them underfoot with all their mischief.

They unconditionally gave our family as much love, as we needed and then some.

However, we realize this is how life is to be. You share only a small piece of your life with someone and then it is gone. We carry on. This holds true to all relationships. Eventually our hearts will heal and our memories will be full of love.

Take the time now to share your love with your companions and let them know it repeatedly. Life is too short.

AACR Annual Meeting 2017: Immunotherapy Provides Long-lasting Responses to Certain Cancer Types – CANCER RESEARCH Catalyst

Now that a plethora of clinical trials have established positive responses from immunotherapies—immune checkpoint inhibitors, in particular—in patients with a variety of cancer types, one of the logical next questions is, are the responses durable?

Source: AACR Annual Meeting 2017: Immunotherapy Provides Long-lasting Responses to Certain Cancer Types – CANCER RESEARCH Catalyst

What it feels like to be an interesting teaching opportunity | The BMJ

Ruth Tapp describes what it feels like for the patient to be the subject of bedside teaching I was walking home one afternoon when I suddenly experienced an excruciatingly sharp pain in my chest, which got worse over the next few hours. That night I found it impossible to find a position I could sleep in—lying flat felt like my chest was being crushed in a vice. By the next morning the pain had radiated into my back, left shoulder, neck, and arm. Finally I called an ambulance. Initially, tests focused on my heart function, which seemed to be fine, so it seemed likely I was going to be told I’d pulled a muscle, given some ibuprofen, and told to go home and lie down—if my chest x ray was fine I’d be free to go. Unfortunately it …

Source: What it feels like to be an interesting teaching opportunity | The BMJ